Monday, August 8, 2016

Tips For Worm Farming In Summer

It's summer and it's hot.   Hot weather brings a special set of problems.  During the winter, your worms became "dormant".  As the temperatures warm up, you worms will wake up and that means you need to wake up, too.

What happens when worms become more active and what do you need to do about it?
  1. The worms start eating more.
  2. The worms start pooping more.
  3. The worms start breeding more.

Here's three things you need to focus on in a worm farm during summer:

1. Worm Bedding


Extra worm activity means you need to up your feed rate, change the bedding more often, and divide  your worms into more beds if you're not selling.

When the weather turns hot, you need to pay special attention to the moisture level of your beds.  Make sure the bedding doesn't dry out, as this will keep the worms cooler.  Generally, you keep the bedding moisture (but not too moist!) in summer versus dryer (but not too dry!) in the winter.

2. Bedding Moisture

If the bedding gets too dry and the heat goes up, your worms will either crawl away or die.  So, needless to say, never let your bedding get too dry  in the summer.

Remember, it the humidity is high, you'll need to water less.  If the humidity is low, you need to water more.  Monitor your worm bed either by "feel" (this develops over time) by running your hands through the bedding every day (several times a day if possible).  Use a meter to gauge the moisture level until you develop the "feel".

3. Worm Breeding

When the weather is warmer, the worms are breeding and laying eggs.  Take advantage of this situation and make sure you're providing abundant food during this time.  Be on the lookout for hatchlings, so you don't damage them when you go into the bedding.  They are very vulnerable during this time.

Tip:  Don't handle worm egg capsules with your bare hands.  The oil on your hands will render the capsules useless.

Keep your worms (and yourself) cool this summer and get ready for the abundant future worm crop.

Get More Worm Farming Tips

How to start a successful worm farm with my worm farm manual.
For a step-by-step guide to worm farming in the summer or any time of year, check out my  Worm Farm Manual: A Step-by-Step Guide to Raising Earthworms for Fun and Profit.  


It's not rocket science, but worm farming does require a certain amount of know-how.  With the right knowledge, you can save time and money as you build your own home based business.

 Avoid costly mistakes, have all the worm growing secrets right at your finger tips.  Start making money quickly and get started on the right track today.  Order your download or hard-copy now.

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Products From Worm Farming

Making A Living Worm Farming

If you're considering starting a worm farm as a home based business,  here is a list of the products that you can sell (including worms, of course):
  1. Worm Egg Capsules or Cocoons
  2.  Worms
  3. Worm Castings
  4. Garden Culture
  5. Vermicompost
This post deals with vermicompost, something you'll have a whole lot of  once you start raising worms.

Vermicompost


What, you may ask, is the difference between compost and vermi-compost? "Compost is a dark, crumbly, earthy-smelling mixture that consists mostly of decayed organic matter."  It is a rich, natural fertilizer, teeming with microbes.  Vermi-compost is merely compost created using earthworms but has the added benefit of containing vermi-cast (worm castings or poo.)

Needless to say, vermicompost is more potent and therefore more vaulaable than simple compost. Most everyone can compost they're leaves, clippings and vegetable clipping.  Few people know how to vermi-compost.  That's where you come in.

As you grow worms, you create (or, rather,  your worms create)  literally tons of this stuff.  When you've used all you can and have the most lush landscape in your county,  it's time to start selling it to other gardeners and horticulturists.

Vermicompst vs. Garden Culture


As described in the previous post in this series, Garden Culture is vermi-compost in which there are a significant amount a worms and worm capsules present.  If you have a thriving worm selling business, you probably want to extract every last worm and worm capsule (egg) of your used bedding and sell just this vermi-compost.

Vermicompost vs. Worm Castings


Vermicompost is good, worm castings are Grrre-At!  This series' five subjects are listed from the most vaulable worm farming commodity to the least valuable.  Therefore, your pricing should reflect this.

Vermicompost is an excellent worm farming by-product to sell locally, but because of it's weight and lower price, it's not a product that sells very well online.  The shipping is just too expensive.  But, you should be able to sell all you have to local farmers, landscapers, home gardeners, etc.

Worms Are Money Machines


From the sale of your  vermi-compost and/or garden culture, you can probably regain the entire cost of worm bedding, worm food and other expenses plus make a profit.  That's one reason worm farming is such a great business.  It's not only eco-friendly, but everything you put into it (and everything the worms put out) turns into money.


Ready To Start Your Own Worm "Money Machine"?

How to start a successful worm farm with my worm farm manual.
For a step-by-step guide to starting your own worm farming business, check out my Worm Farm Manual: A Step-by-Step Guide to Raising Earthworms for Fun and Profit.  


It's not rock science, but worm farming does require a certain amount of know-how.  With the right knowledge, you can save time and money as you build your own home based business.


 Avoid costly mistakes, have all the worm growing secrets right at your finger tips.  Start making money quickly and get started on the right track today.  Order your download or hard-copy now.


Sunday, October 25, 2015

Worm Farming For Profit

What are some of the ways to increase your worm farming profits?  Review the worm growing products list below .
  1. Worm Egg Capsules or Cocoons
  2.  Worms
  3. Worm Castings
  4. Garden Culture
  5. Vermicompost
We've covered three of the five.  Let's examine Garden Culture, an often times overlooked item that sells well locally, as well as online.  

Garden Culture

Local gardeners and farmers, if they are made aware of it's benefits, make a good customer for an easy-to-package garden culture product.  

What is garden culture?  Simply a scoop or bag of partially decomposed worm bedding  with any  worm castings and worms/eggs/hatch-lings it contains.  Gardeners can mix this soil amendment into their growing beds, gardens, or planting soil for improved fertility, tilth, microbes, and aeration.

Extra Profits Less Work


Because garden culture is basically scooped up, weighted, then bagged, there's much less work and time involved on your part, yet the price is good.  Folks are getting several benefits all in one package - soil-improvement, fertilizer, live worms for the future - so the price you can ask is very profitable for the time and effort involved.

I would suggest you use bedding that is in mid-life - not ready for worm castings harvesting but still aged.  It should be "vermi-compost" as apposed to "worm castings".  It should be "organic material" rather than just the peat moss you use to ship bait worms.

Also, use bedding you've already harvested most of the larger worms and cocoons.  Leave enough for a good product, but don't overload it.  Moisten the bedding but don't over-wet, especially if you are shipping it.  Shipping wet products can  be  too expensive for long distance sales.

You can also have a separate area that you use just for Garden Culture production.  This will be a vermi-compost pile or bed that you add leaves, clippings, vegetables and other composting materials, then add worms to decompose the material.  In this bed, you aren't interested in growing bait worms or lots of worms, so it doesn't require a lot of your attention.  Just keep it watered and protected.  Toss occasionally to aerate.

When you get an order, you simply mix the bed, scoop it up into bags, weight and label.  Folks can pick it up, you can deliver it, or you can ship it.  

Don't bag the garden culture up too far ahead if you don't have sales.  You want to keep the product fresh and viable. Sitting around in a bag for too long risks killing the worms and drying out the organic material. Incidentally, the bags you use should be "breathable" to keep the worms alive.

Add Garden Culture to your list of for-sale items and increase your worm farm profits the easy way.

Worm Farming For Profit Information

For more worm farming information, please check out my Worm Farm Manual: A Step-by-Step Guide to Raising Earthworms for Fun and Profit.   Find out other ways to increase your worm farming profits and solve problems.

 If you're thinking about starting a worm farm, this guild shows you how.  Avoid mistakes, save time and money, get off to a good start with this easy to understand, step-by-step guide.

Order your digital download or hard copy today.




Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Feeding Worms Fish Food

Worm Farming Q&A

From time to time on this blog I share questions I receive about raising worms.  Here's a recent one about feeding worms fish food.

Q:  Can I feed my worms fish food?
A:  Probably.  I've never fed worms fish food (it's expensive, I think).  When considering feeding your worms anything, I suggest you follow the following procedure just to be on the safe side (better safe than sorry).

Testing New Worm Food


  1. Pull out a very small number of worms, 5-10, and put them in a separate container with worm bedding.
  2. Feed these worms the worm food you want to try (in this case, fish food).  Spritz the top of the bedding with non-chlorine water; sprinkle on the food; spritz again if the food is dry.
  3. Observe these worms for a few days to see how they react.  If they do well, the food is o.k. to use.  If they start behaving badly you know the food is not suitable for worm food.
By feeding only a small number of worms separately from your worm bed, you don't endanger your entire population of worms.  It always pays to be cautious when considering an untested food or bedding source.

As for the fish food, I would treat it like a grain. As I explain in my worm farm manual, worms should be fed grains only in amounts  they can eat in a day.  Any left over's should be scraped off before adding more. Reduce the amount of grain if the worms don't "clean their plates".

This feeding regime prevents "acid poisoning", a real worm killer and probably the number one reason people fail at worm farming.  Otherwise, bon appitite.

Worm Feeding Information

For more on worm feeding and other worm farming information, please check out my Worm Farm Manual: A Step-by-Step Guide to Raising Earthworms for Fun and Profit.